What Is Dyshidrotic (Pompholyx) Eczema?

Dyshidrotic eczema is where you will experience a sudden rash of small, itchy blisters on your either your palms and the sides of your fingers, or on your feet and toes. Your doctor may refer to it as many different things such as foot-and-hand eczema, vesicular eczema, palmoplantar eczema, and pompholyx eczema.

There is no cure, the blisters, therefore, can come and go. However, you can manage them with medicine, moisturising and healing balms such as DermaGen Manuka Oil Balm, and good hygiene. Once you get to middle age, you may find that they are less common, and if you have a mild case they should retreat on their own.

What Symptoms Should You Look Out For?

The itchy, small blisters are the most noticeable sign that you may have dyshidrotic eczema. They usually show up in clusters. You may also experience:

  • Burning pain or itching before the blisters appear
  • Blisters on the soles of your feet, toes, palms, and fingers
  • Red, cracked skin
  • Sweaty skin surrounding the blisters
  • Nails that thicken and change colours

The blisters will usually go away within 2 to 3 weeks, but you will find that the skin underneath can be tender and red for a while. You can experience both mild and severe cases. If you have them on your feet, it can sometimes make it difficult to walk or on your hands make it difficult to cook, clean etc. They can become infected, some signs include:

  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Crusting
  • Pus in the blisters

What Are The Causes?

Doctors aren’t completely sure of what causes dyshidrotic eczema. It most commonly occurs in adults between the ages of 20 and 40, it is also twice as common in women. If you experience hay fever, there is a family history or history of other forms of eczema, then you are more prone. Causes can include:

  • Stress
  • Contact with metals such as nickel, cobalt, or chromium salts.
  • Sweaty or wet hands and feet
  • Warm or humid weather
  • HIV infection
  • Some treatments for a weak immune system (immunoglobulin)
  • Seasonal allergies like Hay fever

Half of the people who have this type of eczema also have other types, it’s not contagious, and you can’t catch it from someone from touching it.

What Is The Treatment?

Your doctor can prescribe a cream or ointment that contains a steroid to bring down the inflammation and itch. If it is severe you may need medication to help. You can use an antihistamine to help with the itching, too. You can also hold a wet compress for 25 minutes several times a day on the blisters. If they don’t work you may need to try:

  • Light therapy using ultraviolet (UV) light to clear up your skin.
  • Botulinum toxin shots.
  • Medicines that slow your immune system.
  • Draining the blisters.

To control the blisters at home you can try:

Your doctor can prescribe a cream or ointment that contains a steroid to bring down the inflammation and itch. If it is severe you may need medication to help. You can use an antihistamine to help with the itching, too. You can also hold a wet compress for 25 minutes several times a day on the blisters. If they don’t work you may need to try:

  • Washing your hands and feet every day using lukewarm water and mild soap. Pat your skin dry. Make sure you remove any jewellery such as rings before and moisture can get trapped.
  • Wear gloves with cotton liners whenever your hands are in the water, like when you wash dishes.
  • Use a moisturiser or balm such as DermaGen Propolis Balm or Manuka Oil Balm on your hands and feet twice or three times a day. Use it while your skin is wet so it stores the moisture. These soothing, healing balms have ingredients like Manuka Oil which helps to relieve the symptoms such as soothing the itch, inflammation and healing the blisters.
  • Turn on a humidifier in dry weather to keep your skin from cracking.
  • If allergies make it worst try to stay away.
  • Don't scratch the blisters.
  • Alter your diet.

Results

Manuka Balm  applied 2-3 times a day for 5 days.
The redness had settled and blisters cleared up in 5 days.
She has had Dyshidrotic eczema for over a year and had tried other various creams, including those on prescription.

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My son suffers from Dyshidrotic eczema and we have tried all kinds of creams and oils as well as prescribed steroid creams.
When my sons eczema flared up I used it straight away, my son said it took the itch and pain away only after a few minutes and the next day the results were amazing, this eczema had improved by 80%.
After only 3 days his eczema had completely healed.

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